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This was sent to me by Bob Bergen ( A nice guy and great V/O performer)

Bob Bergen posted in LA UNION V.O. ACTORS! .       Bob Bergen February 5 at 1:00pm   *  ******ATTENTION VIDEO GAME PERFORMERS******Vocal stress is one of the important issues on the table in the Interactive Media negotiations. Unfortunately, the employers have not given us a substantive response to our vocal safety proposal. While our goal is still to address vocal safety in our collective bargaining agreement, as long as the employers fail to respond we will be exploring other options to protect performers. To this goal, two members of the negotiating committee recently made a presentation on vocal safety in video games to Cal/OSHA’s Occupational Safety & Health Standards Board. Cal/OSHA, the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, is the state agency that creates regulations around safety in the workplace. There are currently no regulations that specifically address vocal safety. We’d rather not have to petition for new regulations, but since the video game employers are unwilling to address vocal stress in negotiations in a real way, we are investigating this further to protect the voices of our members. To do this, we are collecting material to put together a formal petition to the Cal/OSHA Standards Board around vocal stress. What we need from you: If you have experienced any vocal stress or injury in video game work, please share the story with us so that we can include it in our research. Your name will be kept confidential. When sharing your story, please include: -When it happened -What you were working on (do not violate any NDA’s- something general like “Battle game” will suffice) -How the session was vocally stressful -How long you did vocally stressful work in the session Please also share how the session affected you or your work (e.g., lost voice, fainted, couldn’t work next gig, etc.). Any additional information you feel may be relevant, including if there are certain employers or studios that have a pattern of not looking out for member vocal safety. Finally, please share any ideas you might have on how vocal stress should be addressed. Please send information to Jill King at SAG/AFTRA .Org

Thank you, SAG-AFTRA

******ATTENTION VIDEO GAME PERFORMERS*******

Vocal stress is one of the important issues on the table in the Interactive Media negotiations. Unfortunately, the employers have not given us a substantive response to our vocal safety proposal. While our goal is still to address vocal safety in our collective bargaining agreement, as long as the employers fail to respond we will be exploring other options to protect performers.

To this goal, two members of the negotiating committee recently made a presentation on vocal safety in video games to Cal/OSHA’s Occupational Safety & Health Standards Board.

Cal/OSHA, the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health, is the state agency that creates regulations around safety in the workplace. There are currently no regulations that specifically address vocal safety.

We’d rather not have to petition for new regulations, but since the video game employers are unwilling to address vocal stress in negotiations in a real way, we are investigating this further to protect the voices of our members. To do this, we are collecting material to put together a formal petition to the Cal/OSHA Standards Board around vocal stress.

What we need from you:

If you have experienced any vocal stress or injury in video game work, please share the story with us so that we can include it in our research. Your name will be kept confidential. When sharing your story, please include:

-When it happened

-What you were working on (do not violate any NDA’s- something general like “Battle game” will suffice)

-How the session was vocally stressful

-How long you did vocally stressful work in the session

Please also share how the session affected you or your work (e.g., lost voice, fainted, couldn’t work next gig, etc.).

Any additional information you feel may be relevant, including if there are certain employers or studios that have a pattern of not looking out for member vocal safety.

Finally, please share any ideas you might have on how vocal stress should be addressed.

Please send information to:  Jill King at SAG/AFTRA .Org

Thank you,

——

A great way to make your voices heard!

Arl

The Ol’ SAG Watchdog

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